Box of Illusions (signed)

by Re’gis de Gasperi


Photographs: Re’gis de Gasperi

Text: Re’gis de Gasperi

Publisher: Self-Published

60 pages

Year: 2021

ISBN: 978-65-00-26806-5

Comments: 23 x 34 cm, soft cover (masterblank 270grs and munken 120grs)

sold out

Box of Illusions, by the Brazilian photographer Re’gis de Gasperi, emerged from enchantment close by, through relationships and life, in a suspended time where fact and fiction blend. The visual appeal of black and white, of chiaroscuro, plays a role representing possible choices arising among life-cycle counterpoints. The inner struggle is exposed: acclamation x annihilation.

The ‘home box’ is no longer a physical (real) place, with openings that let in light to form shadows (illusion). Real and illusion merge, as in high contrast. There is no clarity about what is inside or outside. It is life and its heartbeat. This is why the home is memories and portraits. The world appears, unmasked. This does not ease emotional stresses, desperation, and pain, or even attempts at survival during certain dark days. This leads to repetition, inaccuracy, fragility, and the corrosion of images. The choice still remains, through plaudits and praise, through dance, and the raw yielding of bodies and feelings.

Images crafted over a brief period of less than two years, in almost a single setting (the stage, the stage of the home) are not limited to scenes of isolation. Instead, they become universal, representing the maturation of a process and different research paths during almost a decade.

The book also includes a short story titled Forty-six (46), where we can read:
”We soon climbed back up to the inn, and my girls went to their rooms. But I was unwilling for all that to end. From that same wooden deck by the pool, I could see the beginning of the beach. Deserted, there were only footprints in the sand. I gazed at the stage down there, now empty. Although that unique afternoon was ending, my thoughts and feelings still whirled. The dream continued to swirl around me. I poured myself some wine, sat down and stretched out my legs. For a moment, I glanced at my feet, and there was: the same narrator-bird, right there alongside me on the ground, really close, almost leaning on my foot, gazing silently at me. A different silence that was almost embarrassing. I closed my eyes. There was no lack of love.

There were few certainties for me that day. I have no clue whether my body really floated. I don't know if time actually stood still. I don't even know if I drifted out of my illusions box.”


More books by Re’gis de Gasperi

more books tagged »conceptual« | >> see all

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more books tagged »Brazil« | >> see all

more books tagged »Brazilian« | >> see all

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A collector's choice by josefchladek.com

 
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Box of Illusions (signed)

by Re’gis de Gasperi


Photographs: Re’gis de Gasperi

Text: Re’gis de Gasperi

Publisher: Self-Published

60 pages

Year: 2021

ISBN: 978-65-00-26806-5

Comments: 23 x 34 cm, soft cover (masterblank 270grs and munken 120grs)

sold out

Box of Illusions, by the Brazilian photographer Re’gis de Gasperi, emerged from enchantment close by, through relationships and life, in a suspended time where fact and fiction blend. The visual appeal of black and white, of chiaroscuro, plays a role representing possible choices arising among life-cycle counterpoints. The inner struggle is exposed: acclamation x annihilation.

The ‘home box’ is no longer a physical (real) place, with openings that let in light to form shadows (illusion). Real and illusion merge, as in high contrast. There is no clarity about what is inside or outside. It is life and its heartbeat. This is why the home is memories and portraits. The world appears, unmasked. This does not ease emotional stresses, desperation, and pain, or even attempts at survival during certain dark days. This leads to repetition, inaccuracy, fragility, and the corrosion of images. The choice still remains, through plaudits and praise, through dance, and the raw yielding of bodies and feelings.

Images crafted over a brief period of less than two years, in almost a single setting (the stage, the stage of the home) are not limited to scenes of isolation. Instead, they become universal, representing the maturation of a process and different research paths during almost a decade.

The book also includes a short story titled Forty-six (46), where we can read:
”We soon climbed back up to the inn, and my girls went to their rooms. But I was unwilling for all that to end. From that same wooden deck by the pool, I could see the beginning of the beach. Deserted, there were only footprints in the sand. I gazed at the stage down there, now empty. Although that unique afternoon was ending, my thoughts and feelings still whirled. The dream continued to swirl around me. I poured myself some wine, sat down and stretched out my legs. For a moment, I glanced at my feet, and there was: the same narrator-bird, right there alongside me on the ground, really close, almost leaning on my foot, gazing silently at me. A different silence that was almost embarrassing. I closed my eyes. There was no lack of love.

There were few certainties for me that day. I have no clue whether my body really floated. I don't know if time actually stood still. I don't even know if I drifted out of my illusions box.”


More books by Re’gis de Gasperi

more books tagged »conceptual« | >> see all

more books tagged »black and white« | >> see all

more books tagged »Brazil« | >> see all

more books tagged »Brazilian« | >> see all

more books tagged »mixedmedia« | >> see all

A collector's choice by josefchladek.com

Box of Illusions (signed)

by Re’gis de Gasperi


Photographs: Re’gis de Gasperi

Text: Re’gis de Gasperi

Publisher: Self-Published

60 pages

Year: 2021

ISBN: 978-65-00-26806-5

Comments: 23 x 34 cm, soft cover (masterblank 270grs and munken 120grs)

sold out

Box of Illusions, by the Brazilian photographer Re’gis de Gasperi, emerged from enchantment close by, through relationships and life, in a suspended time where fact and fiction blend. The visual appeal of black and white, of chiaroscuro, plays a role representing possible choices arising among life-cycle counterpoints. The inner struggle is exposed: acclamation x annihilation.

The ‘home box’ is no longer a physical (real) place, with openings that let in light to form shadows (illusion). Real and illusion merge, as in high contrast. There is no clarity about what is inside or outside. It is life and its heartbeat. This is why the home is memories and portraits. The world appears, unmasked. This does not ease emotional stresses, desperation, and pain, or even attempts at survival during certain dark days. This leads to repetition, inaccuracy, fragility, and the corrosion of images. The choice still remains, through plaudits and praise, through dance, and the raw yielding of bodies and feelings.

Images crafted over a brief period of less than two years, in almost a single setting (the stage, the stage of the home) are not limited to scenes of isolation. Instead, they become universal, representing the maturation of a process and different research paths during almost a decade.

The book also includes a short story titled Forty-six (46), where we can read:
”We soon climbed back up to the inn, and my girls went to their rooms. But I was unwilling for all that to end. From that same wooden deck by the pool, I could see the beginning of the beach. Deserted, there were only footprints in the sand. I gazed at the stage down there, now empty. Although that unique afternoon was ending, my thoughts and feelings still whirled. The dream continued to swirl around me. I poured myself some wine, sat down and stretched out my legs. For a moment, I glanced at my feet, and there was: the same narrator-bird, right there alongside me on the ground, really close, almost leaning on my foot, gazing silently at me. A different silence that was almost embarrassing. I closed my eyes. There was no lack of love.

There were few certainties for me that day. I have no clue whether my body really floated. I don't know if time actually stood still. I don't even know if I drifted out of my illusions box.”


More books by Re’gis de Gasperi

more books tagged »conceptual« | >> see all

more books tagged »black and white« | >> see all

more books tagged »Brazil« | >> see all

more books tagged »Brazilian« | >> see all

more books tagged »mixedmedia« | >> see all

A collector's choice by josefchladek.com