Black Sea of Concrete (review copy)

by Rafal Milach


Photographs: Rafal Milach

Text: Rafal Milach

Publisher: selfpublished

76 pages

Pictures: 27 colour illustrations

Year: 2013

Price: 165     99.00

Comments: Original edition is a collector's edition of 300 copies signed and numbered + signed print; Size of the book: 335×270 mm, Size of the print: 210 ×265 mm. Design by Ania Nalecka/TBD. This is a review copy without a number and without a print and without the box. Instead of the number it says X/300. The X is handwritten by the author.

The first thing you notice by the sea is the concrete. Kilometers of grey blocks sometimes painted with blue and yellow, the national colors of Ukraine. You can feel the soviet past at once. It looks surreal and it doesn't match the beautiful landscape that surrounds you. Industrial zones and the iron waste by the sea don't remind harmonic idyll between nature and man. People have changed the landscape in a very brutal way here. But the sea fights back for its natural shape and territory. Local people seem to respect the power of the sea. Nevertheless at he same time they thoughtlessly devastate it. This wired symbiosis makes this piece of land fascinating. I went to the Ukrainian Black Sea coast to explore this mutual influence and relation between the man and sea. Ukraine is the country in transition and for the last few years has been looking for its new identity. In my opinion so has the Black Sea coast.

Rafal Milach is a member of the Sputnik Photos collective and a member of Magnum Photos.


More books by Rafal Milach

A collector's choice by josefchladek.com

 
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Black Sea of Concrete (review copy)

by Rafal Milach


Photographs: Rafal Milach

Text: Rafal Milach

Publisher: selfpublished

76 pages

Pictures: 27 colour illustrations

Year: 2013

Price: 165     99.00

Comments: Original edition is a collector's edition of 300 copies signed and numbered + signed print; Size of the book: 335×270 mm, Size of the print: 210 ×265 mm. Design by Ania Nalecka/TBD. This is a review copy without a number and without a print and without the box. Instead of the number it says X/300. The X is handwritten by the author.

The first thing you notice by the sea is the concrete. Kilometers of grey blocks sometimes painted with blue and yellow, the national colors of Ukraine. You can feel the soviet past at once. It looks surreal and it doesn't match the beautiful landscape that surrounds you. Industrial zones and the iron waste by the sea don't remind harmonic idyll between nature and man. People have changed the landscape in a very brutal way here. But the sea fights back for its natural shape and territory. Local people seem to respect the power of the sea. Nevertheless at he same time they thoughtlessly devastate it. This wired symbiosis makes this piece of land fascinating. I went to the Ukrainian Black Sea coast to explore this mutual influence and relation between the man and sea. Ukraine is the country in transition and for the last few years has been looking for its new identity. In my opinion so has the Black Sea coast.

Rafal Milach is a member of the Sputnik Photos collective and a member of Magnum Photos.


More books by Rafal Milach

A collector's choice by josefchladek.com

Black Sea of Concrete (review copy)

by Rafal Milach


Photographs: Rafal Milach

Text: Rafal Milach

Publisher: selfpublished

76 pages

Pictures: 27 colour illustrations

Year: 2013

Price: 165     99.00

Comments: Original edition is a collector's edition of 300 copies signed and numbered + signed print; Size of the book: 335×270 mm, Size of the print: 210 ×265 mm. Design by Ania Nalecka/TBD. This is a review copy without a number and without a print and without the box. Instead of the number it says X/300. The X is handwritten by the author.

The first thing you notice by the sea is the concrete. Kilometers of grey blocks sometimes painted with blue and yellow, the national colors of Ukraine. You can feel the soviet past at once. It looks surreal and it doesn't match the beautiful landscape that surrounds you. Industrial zones and the iron waste by the sea don't remind harmonic idyll between nature and man. People have changed the landscape in a very brutal way here. But the sea fights back for its natural shape and territory. Local people seem to respect the power of the sea. Nevertheless at he same time they thoughtlessly devastate it. This wired symbiosis makes this piece of land fascinating. I went to the Ukrainian Black Sea coast to explore this mutual influence and relation between the man and sea. Ukraine is the country in transition and for the last few years has been looking for its new identity. In my opinion so has the Black Sea coast.

Rafal Milach is a member of the Sputnik Photos collective and a member of Magnum Photos.


More books by Rafal Milach

A collector's choice by josefchladek.com